granisetron transdermal system (patch), Sancuso

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

What is the dosage for granisetron transdermal system (patch)?

A single patch is applied to clean, dry, intact healthy skin on the upper outer arm 24-48 hours before chemotherapy is begun and not removed until at least 24 hours after completion of chemotherapy. The patch may be worn for up to seven days. It should not be applied on skin that is red, irritated, or damaged because of concerns about increasing inflammation and increased absorption of drug. Each patch is packed in a pouch and should be applied immediately after the pouch has been opened. The patch should not be cut into pieces.

Which drugs or supplements interact with granisetron transdermal system (patch)?

Drug interaction studies have not been conducted with granisetron. Granisetron is broken down in the body by cytochrome P-450 liver enzymes. Drugs that increase (for example, phenobarbital) or decrease (for example, ketoconazole [Nizoral, Extina, Xolegel, Kuric]) the activity of cytochrome P-450 liver enzymes may affect the levels of granisetron in the body.

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