Gonorrhea In Women (cont.)

Medical Author:
Medical Editor:

How is gonorrhea diagnosed?

Testing for gonorrhea is done by swabbing the infected site (rectum, throat, cervix) and identifying the bacteria in the laboratory either through culturing of the material from the swab (growing the bacteria) or identification of the genetic material from the bacteria. Sometimes the tests do not show bacteria because of sampling errors (the sampled area does not contain bacteria) or other technical difficulties, even when the woman has an infection. Newer tests to diagnose gonorrhea involve the use of DNA probes or amplification techniques (for example, polymerase chain reaction, or PCR) to identify the genetic material of the bacteria. These tests are more expensive than cultures but typically yield more rapid results.

What is the treatment for gonorrhea?

Comment on this

In the past, the treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea was fairly simple. A single injection of penicillin cured almost every infected person. Unfortunately, there are new strains of gonorrhea that have become resistant to various antibiotics, including penicillins, and are therefore more difficult to treat. Fortunately, gonorrhea can still be treated by other injectable or oral medications.

Uncomplicated gonococcal infections of the cervix, urethra, and rectum, are usually treated by a single injection of ceftriaxone intramuscularly or by 400mg of cefixime (Suprax) in a single oral dose. For uncomplicated gonococcal infections of the pharynx, the recommended treatment is 125 mg of ceftriaxone in a single IM dose.

Alternative regimens for uncomplicated gonococcal infections of the cervix, urethra, and rectum are 2 g of spectinomycin in nonpregnant women (not available in the United States) in a single IM dose or single doses of cephalosporins (ceftizoxime, 500 mg IM; or cefoxitin, 2 g IM, administered with probenecid (Benemid), 1 g orally; or cefotaxime, 500 mg IM).

Treatment should always include medication that will treat chlamydia [for example, azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax) or doxycycline (Vibramycin, Oracea, Adoxa, Atridox and others)] as well as gonorrhea, because gonorrhea and chlamydia frequently exist together in the same person. The sexual partners of women who have had either gonorrhea or chlamydia must receive treatment for both infections since their partners may be infected as well. Treating the partners also prevents reinfection of the woman. Women suffering from PID require more aggressive treatment that is effective against the bacteria that cause gonorrhea as well as against other organisms. These women often require hospitalization and intravenous administration of antibiotics.

It is important to note that doxycycline, one of the recommended drugs for treatment of PID, is not recommended for use in pregnant women.

Gonorrhea is one of the easier STDs to prevent because the bacterium that causes the infection can survive only under certain conditions. The use of condoms protects against gonorrhea infection. Since the organism can live in the throat, condoms should be used during oral-genital contact as well.

Medically reviewed by Edmund Petrilli, MD; American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology with subspecialty in Gynecologic Oncology

Previous contributing author: Carolyn Janet Crandall, MD, FACP

REFERENCES:

"Current Concepts in Bacterial Sexually Transmitted Diseases" Bong Suk Shim

"Chlamydial infection increases gonococcal colonization in a novel murine coinfection model"
Rachel A. Vonck et al

"Pelvic inflammatory disease"
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/7/2014

Patient Comments

Viewers share their comments

Gonorrhea In Women - Symptoms Question: Did you have symptoms before being diagnosed with gonorrhea? If so, what were they, and did you see a doctor?
Gonorrhea In Women - Treatment Question: Please discuss forms of treatment, including medication, that have been used for gonorrhea in you or someone you know.
Gonorrhea In Women - Diagnosis Question: How was your gonorrhea diagnosed?

STAY INFORMED

Get the Latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!