Goldthread

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What other names is Goldthread known by?

Anemone groenlandica, Cankerroot, Chinese Coptis, Chinese Goldthread, Coptide, Coptide à Trois Feuilles, Coptide Chinois, Coptide du Groenland, Coptide Savoyane, Coptide Trifoliolée, Coptidis Rhizome, Coptis, Coptis chinensis, Coptis deltoidea, Coptis groenlandica, Coptis Rhizome, Coptis teeta, Coptis teetoides, Coptis trifolia, Golden Thread, Goldenthread, Huang Lian, Huanglian, Mouth Root, Racine Jaune, Rhizoma Coptidis, Savoyane, Tisavoyane Jaune, Yellowroot.

What is Goldthread?

Goldthread is a plant. The underground stem (rhizome) is used to make medicine.

Goldthread is used for digestive disorders, parasite infections including leishmaniasis, and trichomoniasis, and a skin condition called psoriasis.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Digestive problems.
  • Leishmaniasis (a parasite infection that affects the skin).
  • Trichomoniasis (a parasite infection that is transmitted sexually).
  • Psoriasis (a skin condition).
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of goldthread for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

Quick GuideVitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough?

Vitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough?

How does Goldthread work?

Goldthread might decrease acid in the stomach. It also appears to have antibacterial effects.

Are there safety concerns?

There is not enough information to know if goldthread is safe in medicinal amounts. Goldthread is UNSAFE in newborn infants.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: Goldthread is UNSAFE in children. It contains a chemical called berberine that can increase the amount of bilirubin in newborns. Bilirubin is a chemical released by the liver. Too much bilirubin can lead to permanent brain damage in newborns, especially in newborns born too early.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Goldthread is UNSAFE during pregnancy. It contains a chemical called berberine that is thought to cross the placenta and may cause harm to the developing child. Brain damage due to too much bilirubin has developed in newborn infants exposed to berberine. Beginning research suggests pregnant women who take goldthread during the first three months of pregnancy increase the risk that their newborns will have birth defects affecting the central nervous system.

It's also UNSAFE for breast-feeding mothers to take goldthread. Berberine and other harmful chemicals in goldthread can be transferred to the infant through breast milk.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

The body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) to get rid of it. Goldthread might decrease how fast the body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune). This might cause there to be too much cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) in the body and potentially cause side effects.



Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Goldthread might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking goldthread along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking goldthread, talk to your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), lovastatin (Mevacor), clarithromycin (Biaxin), indinavir (Crixivan), sildenafil (Viagra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

Dosing considerations for Goldthread.

The appropriate dose of goldthread depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for goldthread. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
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Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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