GLUCAGON-INJECTION, Glucagon

Type 2 Diabetes Warning Signs

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea and vomiting may occur but are also signs of low blood sugar. Allergy symptoms such as skin rash and breathing trouble have been reported with this medication. Inform your doctor if you experience any of these effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

PRECAUTIONS: All patients with diabetes should have a glucagon emergency kit available. Friends and relatives of a diabetic patient should know the symptoms of hypoglycemia and be instructed how to administer glucagon if necessary. Detailed patient instructions are provided with the medication. Be sure to read them completely and ask your doctor or pharmacist any questions you may have. This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy. It is not known if this medication appears in breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Be aware of symptoms of hypoglycemia - stomach pain, anxious feeling, chills, cold sweats, confusion, cool skin, difficulty in concentrating, drowsiness, hunger, rapid heart rate, headache, nausea, vomiting, shakiness, unsteadiness, vision changes or weakness. Eat or drink a source of sugar if you experience these symptoms. Have someone take you to a hospital if your symptoms do not improve. If severe symptoms occur, diabetics should not eat or drink anything. Emergency medical aid is needed. After injection of glucagon, the patient must be turned on their side to avoid choking. The doctor must be called. The patient should regain consciousness in less than 15 minutes. If not, a second dose may be given. A sugar source should be given when the patient regains consciousness. Glucagon is only effective for 90 minutes and is to be used only until the patient is able to swallow. The blood sugar level should be kept up by eating snacks consisting of crackers, cheese, half a sandwich or a glass of milk. The blood sugar should be checked hourly for 3 to 4 hours after regaining consciousness.

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CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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