glipizide and metformin (Metaglip has been discontinued in the US)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

What is glipizide/metformin hydrochloride?

  • Glipizide/metformin is a combination antidiabetic medication that contains two commonly used glucose (sugar) lowering agents, glipizide (Glucotrol) and metformin (Glucophage). These agents work in different, yet complementary ways to improve blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes.
    • Glipizide is a second generation oral sulfonylurea that lowers blood glucose by stimulating the production of insulin from the pancreas. It is the major hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar.
    • Metformin is an oral biguanide antidiabetic medication that decreases the production of glucose in the liver, decreases the absorption of glucose by the intestines, and increases response to insulin.
  • In clinical studies, glipizide/metformin therapy was superior in improving fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose (blood glucose levels after a meal), and HbA1c versus treatment with either agent alone.
  • Combination glipizide and metformin was approved by the FDA in October 2002.

What brand names are available for glipizide/metformin hydrochloride?

  • There are no brand names available for glipizide/metformin hydrochloride in the US.
  • Metaglip is a discontinued brand name for glipizide/metformin hydrochloride.

Is glipizide/metformin hydrochloride available as a generic drug?

Yes

Do I need a prescription for glipizide/metformin hydrochloride?

Yes

What are the uses for glipizide/metformin hydrochloride?

What are the side effects of glipizide/metformin hydrochloride?

The most common side effects associated with glipizide/metformin treatment are:

Side effects related to the stomach were most commonly reported by patients who newly started treatment with glipizide/metformin and included:

Other less common but potentially serious side effects include:

Metformin can cause a rare but serious condition known as lactic acidosis, a build-up of acid in the blood. Lactic acidosis can cause death and requires immediate treatment.

Symptoms of lactic acidosis include:

Patients suspected of presenting with signs or symptoms of lactic acidosis must seek emergency medical help.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/16/2016

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