Genital Herpes in Women

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

Quick GuideSexually Transmitted Diseases: HPV, Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Herpes, HIV

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: HPV, Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Herpes, HIV

What kind of doctors treats genital herpes?

Genital herpes is treated by primary care providers including internal medicine and family medicine specialists, as well as pediatricians for adolescents. For women, gynecologists are often the treating physicians. In certain circumstances, other specialists may be consulted, including urologists and infectious disease specialists.

How is genital herpes diagnosed?

In most cases in which the characteristic signs and symptoms are present, they are sufficient to establish a diagnosis of genital herpes infection. Laboratory tests, such as viral culture and nucleic acid amplification (polymerase chain reaction or PCR) tests to detect the genetic material of the virus, are also available.

Immunologic tests to identify antibodies to genital herpes are other possible tests to establish whether infection has occurred.

Is there a cure for genital herpes?

There is no cure for genital herpes, and once a person is infected with genital herpes, the infection persists throughout the individual's life, with the potential for recurrent outbreaks. However, there are medications that can reduce the severity and frequency of outbreaks and treatments to manage the symptoms.

Are home remedies or natural treatments effective for genital herpes?

There are no home or natural remedies available for genital herpes, and as mentioned above, the infection cannot be cured. Home cares such as warm baths, keeping the blisters dry after washing, and wearing loose-fitting, cotton underwear may help soothe symptoms.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/25/2016

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Newsletters

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

VIEW PATIENT COMMENTS
  • Genital Herpes - Treatment

    What kind of treatment are you using for genital herpes?

    Post View 7 Comments
  • Genital Herpes - Symptoms

    What symptoms of genital herpes did you have with your first outbreak?

    Post
  • Genital Herpes - Experience

    Please share your experience with genital herpes, for example, symptoms and medications that help decrease outbreaks.

    Post

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors