Patient Comments: Gastroparesis - Describe Your Experience

Please describe your experience with gastroparesis.

Comment from: Countrymon51, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: December 16

I was diagnosed in December 2012 with idiopathic gastroparesis. I got it from oral surgery. I had a bone graft done and two days later my symptoms started up. I was directed to a gastroenterologist who sent me to numerous tests. A gastric emptying test revealed I had severe delayed emptying. I was on so many medication changes, and diet changes. I lost about 35 pounds in the first year. Although I started my symptoms from oral surgery, my doctor thinks I got it from a virus. Just two months ago I was placed on the stimulator. I suffer mostly from constant nausea and vomiting. I just seem to vomit every time after I eat. I have been vomiting up to 7 or 8 times a day. Even with the stimulator I am still vomiting. It started out great, but in a short time it all came back.

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Comment from: Linda, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: October 28

I was recently told I have GP (gastroparesis) after several severe bouts of uncontrollable diarrhea and decidedly nasty vomiting that smelled and tasted like sulfur. I'm type 2 diabetic and have recently started insulin hoping to stave off more problems. I've barely started any major testing because I've had a hard time getting any appointments that anyone would consider timely. I don't vomit much, but I do suffer from fluctuating diarrhea and constipation along with major bloating. When the diarrhea returns, it is always preceded by what I call a "liquefied gut." By this, I mean there is a decidedly loud grumbling in my lower abdomen coupled with a fair amount of pain. When this starts, I know it's only a matter of time before the diarrhea returns. I think I may also have IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) because I find myself lactose intolerant, fructose intolerant, and mildly gluten intolerant. I've had a colonoscopy and an endoscopy and only found that I have a tortuous esophagus. Along with all of this, I constantly feel full after eating the smallest amount of food. Doing an abbreviated liquidation diet does nothing to provide me with the nutrition I need to remain healthy. My hope is that I find out what is going on in my body and that no one else ever has to suffer this horrible disorder/disease in the future.

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Comment from: AP, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: December 04

I was diagnosed with gastroparesis two years ago after having a gastric motility scan. My gastroenterologist told me it probably came from a bad stomach virus I had suffered previously. We were hopeful I might overcome the gastroparesis in time, and for a while, I had a very mild case. (I was even was able to get off Prevacid by making changes in my diet.) Unfortunately, stress and another minor stomach bug appear to have erased those gains. I now have constant reflux that is barely controlled by Prevacid (taken twice every day), and I am on Carafate to protect my throat. I'm nearly at the end of the diet and lifestyle changes I can make: I do not smoke, drink, or drink soda. I am a vegetarian, so most of the big triggers were not in my daily routine even before I got gastroparesis. I've moved to small frequent meals and away from anything fried or fatty. The hardest part is the nausea and throat pain, I am finding that having no food in my stomach is as much a nausea trigger as having too much. Some days it's not clear what is triggering things to be worse or better. I do still drink coffee, but only in small amounts and on a full stomach. I cannot tolerate Reglan, and I am afraid to take domperidone. (The arrhythmia side effects scare me.) Coffee or a little bit of chocolate does seem to help get things moving after I eat. I can't take them on an empty stomach though; they make me feel sick if I do that.

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Comment from: wowgeebear, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: March 04

I know what you mean by swelling to the point of severe pain after eating. With gastroparesis I cannot eat anything, I swell and can't breathe, and it pushes on my diaphragm. I have also tried Reglan, then my restless legs kick in. I have been to emergency room 28 times in 1 year and they gave me morphine and sent me home. I have been from doctor to doctor and after 4 1/2 years I am still suffering. I even went to pain specialist.

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Comment from: Mike, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: February 26

I just got diagnosed with gastroparesis and my endocrinologist swears he has no idea why as I have Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenal insufficiency. I got an endoscopy 10 months ago and the gastroenterologist said my stomach being whacked out was a coincidence and then fired me. With the new gastroenterologist I had to go eat an egg, and he finalized the diagnosis. I am in a lot of pain and emotionally spent as all the endocrinologist said was to take more steroids for my adrenals.

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Gastroparesis - Diagnosis Question: How was your gastroparesis diagnosed?
Gastroparesis - Possible Causes Question: What do you believe was the cause of your gastroparesis?
Gastroparesis - Symptoms Question: What symptoms do you experience with your gastroparesis?
Gastroparesis - Treatment Question: What kinds of treatment, including diet and medication, have you tried for gastroparesis?

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