Frostbite and Cold Weather-Related Injuries

  • Medical Author:
    Steven Doerr, MD

    Steven Doerr, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Doerr received his undergraduate degree in Spanish from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He graduated with his Medical Degree from the University Of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado in 1998 and completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine from Denver Health Medical Center in Denver, Colorado in 2002, where he also served as Chief Resident.

  • Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

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Self-Care at Home

If there is no underlying medical condition that requires treatment by a physician, there are things that can be done to reduce urinary frequency.

  • Bladder retraining: This treatment is helpful for overactive bladder syndrome. It involves holding your urine for a slightly longer time than you usually do. The intervals are lengthened, often over the course of about 12 weeks. This helps retrain the bladder to hold urine longer and to urinate less frequently.
  • Kegel exercises: These are exercises in which you contract and release the pelvic floor muscles. These are the muscles you use when you voluntarily stop and then restart the flow of urine. Toning these muscles can help improve bladder control and reduce urinary urgency and frequency. Squeeze for three seconds, then relax for three seconds. Repeat 10 to 15 times per session, and do this at least three times a day. Kegel exercises are only effective when done regularly.
  • Modify your diet: Avoid foods that appear to irritate your bladder or act as a diuretic, including caffeine, alcohol, carbonated drinks, artificial sweeteners, tomato-based products, chocolate, and spicy foods. Eat a high-fiber diet, because constipation can worsen the symptoms of overactive bladder syndrome.
  • Monitor fluid intake: Drink enough to prevent constipation and over-concentration of urine. Drink as little as possible four to five hours before bedtime to reduce or eliminate nighttime urination.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/23/2016

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