Folliculitis

  • Medical Author:
    Gary W. Cole, MD, FAAD

    Dr. Cole is board certified in dermatology. He obtained his BA degree in bacteriology, his MA degree in microbiology, and his MD at the University of California, Los Angeles. He trained in dermatology at the University of Oregon, where he completed his residency.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

How to Avoid Hot Tub Rash

Hot tub rash is an infection of the skin (dermatitis) or of the hair follicles in the skin (folliculitis) acquired from contact with contaminated water. The infection occurs most commonly after swimming in hot tubs or spas, but contaminated swimmingpools or lakes may also spread the infection.

Picture of Folliculitis

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Folliculitis facts

  • Folliculitis is a very common, benign skin disorder that appears as pinpoint red bumps, each one involving a hair follicle, occasionally with a small dot of pus at the top.
  • Folliculitis affects people of all ages, from babies to seniors.
  • The numerous smooth little tender red bumps involve the hair follicles commonly on the face, scalp, chest, back, buttocks, and legs.
  • Folliculitis is often seen in otherwise healthy people; it's easily curable in most cases, and frequently clears on its own without treatment although it may require ongoing maintenance therapy.
  • Antibacterial over-the-counter medications containing benzoyl peroxide are often used to treat folliculitis, but resistant cases may need antibiotic pills to clear the skin.
  • Good skin hygiene and proper shaving techniques have been shown to prevent folliculitis. Continue Reading
Reviewed on 2/23/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Durdu, M., and M. Ilkit. "First Step in the Differential Diagnosis of Folliculitis: Cytology." Crit Rev Microbiol. 39 (2013): 9-25.

Leulmo-Aguilar, Jesus, and Mireia Sabat Santandreu. "Folliculitis: Recognition and Management." Am J Clin Dermatol 5.5 (2004): 301-310.

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