fluticasone (Flonase, Flonase Allergy Relief)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

View 10 Common Allergy Triggers

Over-the-Counter:

  • Children 12 years or older use 2 sprays in each nostril once daily for 1 week, and use 1 or 2 sprays in each nostril once daily as needed for for weeks, up to 2 to 6 months. Consult a doctor before using for more than 6 months.
  • Children 4 to 11 years should use 1 spray in each nostril daily.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Ritonavir (Norvir) and ketoconazole (Nizoral, Extina, Xolegel, Kuric) increase fluticasone levels in the body by delaying its metabolism (elimination). It is not clear how important this effect is.

PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of fluticasone to determine its safety and effectiveness in pregnant women.

NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known whether fluticasone enters breast milk; therefore, it is best to be cautious before using it in nursing mothers.

Medically reviewed by Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/14/2015

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