fluticasone furoate nasal spray (Veramyst)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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GENERIC NAME: fluticasone

BRAND NAME: Veramyst

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Fluticasone is a synthetic steroid of the glucocorticoid family of drugs that is used for treating allergic conditions involving the nose. Fluticasone mimics the naturally-occurring hormone produced by the adrenal glands, cortisol or hydrocortisone. The exact mechanism of action of fluticasone is unknown. Fluticasone has potent anti-inflammatory actions. It is believed that fluticasone exerts its beneficial effects by inhibiting several types of cells and chemicals involved in allergic, immune and inflammatory responses. When used as a nasal inhaler or spray, the medication goes directly to the lining within the nose, and very little is absorbed into the rest of the body. The FDA approved fluticasone in October 1994.

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Intranasal spray: 50 or 27.5 mcg per actuation

STORAGE: Fluticasone should be stored at 4 C and 30 C (39 F and 86 F) and shaken well before each use.

PRESCRIBED FOR: Fluticasone is used for the control of symptoms of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis (hay fever), a condition in which the lining of the nose swells and releases fluid that results in a stuffy and runny nose.

DOSING: Fluticasone usually is administered as two sprays in each nostril once daily, or one spray in each nostril twice daily. After a few days of continuous use, one spray in each nostril once daily may be sufficient if using Flonase. The dose for children is 1 to 2 sprays in each nostril once daily.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Ritonavir (Norvir) and ketoconazole (Nizoral) may increase the blood concentrations of fluticasone and potentially increase its side effects. Drugs that reduce the action of liver enzymes that breakdown fluticasone should not be combined with fluticasone.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/28/2015

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