flunisolide nasal spray, Aerospan (Nasalide, Aerobid, Aerobid HFA are discontinued)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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What is flunisolide nasal spray, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Flunisolide is a synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid. It is administered either as an oral metered-dose inhaler for the treatment of asthma (Aerobid) or as a nasal spray for treating allergic rhinitis. Corticosteroids are naturally- occurring hormones that prevent or suppress inflammation and immune responses. When given as an intranasal spray, flunisolide reduces watery nasal discharge (rhinorrhea), nasal congestion, postnasal drip, sneezing, and itching at the back of the throat that are common allergic symptoms. Eye symptoms such as itching and tearing that may be associated with allergy sometimes also are relieved. A beneficial response usually is noted within a few days but can take as long as 4 weeks. In asthmatic patients, the suppression of inflammation within the airways reduces the swelling caused by inflammation that narrows the airways. At the same time, mucus is reduced. Approximately 50% of flunisolide is absorbed into the blood. Flunisolide was FDA approved in September 1981.

What brand names are available for flunisolide nasal spray?

Aerospan

Is flunisolide nasal spray available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

Do I need a prescription for flunisolide nasal spray?

Yes

What are the side effects of flunisolide nasal spray?

The most common side effects of flunisolide are:

Other adverse effects include:

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What is the dosage for flunisolide nasal spray?

The canister should be shaken before each use.

  • For adults, the usual starting dose is two sprays in each nostril twice daily. The dose may be increased to 3 or 4 times per day.
  • In children ages 6-14 years, the usual starting dose is one spray in each nostril three times per day or two sprays in each nostril twice daily.
  • The adult dose for treating asthma is 2 inhalations twice daily not to exceed 8 inhalations per day.
  • The children's dose for treating asthma is 2 inhalations twice daily.

Which drugs or supplements interact with flunisolide nasal spray?

No drug interactions have been described with nasal flunisolide

Is flunisolide nasal spray safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

Well-controlled studies on the use of flunisolide during pregnancy have not been done. Studies in animals have shown flunisolide to have damaging effects on the fetus. During pregnancy flunisolide should be avoided unless the physician feels that the potential therapeutic benefit justifies the added risk to the fetus.

It is unknown whether flunisolide accumulates in breast milk; however, it is known that other corticosteroids are excreted in breast milk. The effects on the child, if any, are unknown.

What else should I know about flunisolide nasal spray?

What preparations of flunisolide nasal spray are available?

Nasal spray: 0.025 mg or 0.029 mg/spray. Oral Inhaler: 80 mcg/actuation.

How should I keep flunisolide nasal spray stored?

Flnisolide should be stored at room temperature between 15 C - 30 C (59 F - 86 F) and should be protected from heat, and direct light.

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

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Reviewed on 5/22/2015
References
Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

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