Eye Floaters

  • Medical Author:
    Andrew A. Dahl, MD, FACS

    Andrew A. Dahl, MD, is a board-certified ophthalmologist. Dr. Dahl's educational background includes a BA with Honors and Distinction from Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, and an MD from Cornell University, where he was selected for Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society. He had an internal medical internship at the New York Hospital/Cornell Medical Center.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

View the Eye Diseases and Conditions Slideshow Pictures

Quick GuideEye Problems Pictures Slideshow: Recognize These Common Eye Conditions

Eye Problems Pictures Slideshow: Recognize These Common Eye Conditions

How common are eye floaters?

Eye floaters are extremely common in adults and are a leading symptom that causes people to see an ophthalmologist. Almost everyone has eye floaters by age 70, although some people are much more aware of them than others. It is unusual for children under 16 years of age to notice eye floaters unassociated with eye disease.

What eye diseases are associated with eye floaters?

Abnormal eye floaters are associated with the retinopathy of diabetes, retinal tears, retinal detachment, and large degrees of nearsightedness. They occur more commonly in people who have had injury to the eyes, surgery to remove cataracts, or YAG laser surgery after cataract surgery. Tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, and acute retinal necrosis of the eye are other inflammatory diseases that are associated with eye floaters. An unusual ocular condition called asteroid hyalosis is also a cause of eye floaters. Primary or secondary tumors in the eye, including lymphoma and leukemia, are associated with eye floaters, but these are extremely rare.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/3/2016

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  • Floaters - Describe Your Experience

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  • Floaters - Causes

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  • Floaters - What They Look Like

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  • Floaters - How Common?

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  • Floaters - Disappearance

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  • Floaters - Surgery

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