Eye Floaters

  • Medical Author:
    Andrew A. Dahl, MD, FACS

    Andrew A. Dahl, MD, is a board-certified ophthalmologist. Dr. Dahl's educational background includes a BA with Honors and Distinction from Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, and an MD from Cornell University, where he was selected for Alpha Omega Alpha, the national medical honor society. He had an internal medical internship at the New York Hospital/Cornell Medical Center.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Seeing Spots?

Spots in front of the eyes: Also known as "floaters," blurry spots that drift in front of the eyes but do not block vision. The blur is the result of debris from the vitreous casting a shadow on the retina. The spot is the image formed by a deposit of protein drifting about in the vitreous, the clear jelly-like substance that fills the middle of the eye.

Quick GuideCommon Eye Problems and Infections

Common Eye Problems and Infections

What are eye floaters?

"Eye floaters" are deposits or condensation in the vitreous (often referred to as vitreous humor, vitreous fluid, or vitreous gel), the material that fills the posterior part of the eye. People use the term eye floaters to describe seeing spots within their vision that move or "float" when they look around. Eye floaters may be present in only one eye or both eyes.

Why do people notice eye floaters?

The structures in the front of the eye (the cornea and lens) focus rays of light onto the retina. Light coming from images around us focused onto the retina allows one to see. The light going to the retina passes through the vitreous humor, which is a jellylike material that occupies the back two-thirds of the eye. At birth and during childhood years, the vitreous gel is usually totally clear and transparent. Later in life, strands, deposits, or liquid pockets very commonly develop within the vitreous gel. Each of these strands casts a small shadow onto the surface of the retina, and these shadows may be perceived by the patient as eye floaters. They are usually light black to grey in color. As the eye moves from side to side or up and down, these strands, deposits, or pockets also shift in position within the eye, making the shadows move and appear to float or undulate.

Reviewed on 5/3/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Henry, C., et al. "Endophthalmitis following pars plana vitrectomy for vitreous floaters." Clin Ophthalmol 8 (2014): 1649-1653.

Webb, B. F., et al. "of vitreous floaters in a community sample of smartphone users." International Journal of Ophthalmology 6.3 (2013): 402-405. IMAGES:

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