Evening Primrose Oil

How does Evening Primrose Oil work?

Evening primrose oil contains "fatty acids." Some women with breast pain might not have high enough levels of certain "fatty acids." Fatty acids also seem to help decrease inflammation related to conditions such as arthritis and eczema.

Are there safety concerns?

Evening primrose oil is LIKELY SAFE for most people when used for up to a year. It can sometimes cause mild side effects including upset stomach, nausea, diarrhea, and headache.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Taking evening primrose oil is POSSIBLY UNSAFE during pregnancy. It might increase the chance of having complications. Don't use it if you are pregnant.

It is POSSIBLY SAFE to take evening primrose oil during breast-feeding, but it's best to check with your healthcare provider first.

Bleeding disorders: There is a concern that evening primrose oil might increase the chance of bruising and bleeding. Don't use it if you have a bleeding disorder.

Epilepsy or another seizure disorder: There is a concern that taking evening primrose oil might make seizures more likely in some people. If you have a history of seizure, avoid using it.

Schizophrenia: Seizures have been reported in people with schizophrenia treated with phenothiazine drugs, GLA (a chemical found in evening primrose oil), and vitamin E. Get your healthcare provider's opinion before starting evening primrose oil.

Surgery: Evening primrose oil might increase the chance of bleeding during or after surgery. Stop using it at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.


Therapeutic Research Faculty copyright

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Health Solutions From Our Sponsors