Conjugated Estrogens (Cenestin, Enjuvia, Estrace, and Others) (cont.)

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What are the side effects of conjugated estrogens?

There are many side effects of conjugated estrogens. Common side effects of conjugated estrogens are nausea, headache, pain, swelling of breasts, weight change, abdominal pain, anxiety, edema, vaginal bleeding, and mood disturbances.

Estrogens can cause salt (sodium) and water retention (edema). Therefore, patients with heart failure or reduced function of their kidneys who are taking estrogens should be carefully observed for retention of water and its complications.

Blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis or DVT) or lungs (pulmonary embolism) occasionally occur in women taking conjugated estrogens. This potentially serious complication of estrogen therapy is dose-related, that is, it occurs more commonly with higher doses. Therefore, the lowest effective doses that relieve symptoms should be used. Cigarette smokers are at a higher risk for blood clots. Therefore, patients requiring estrogen therapy should quit smoking.

Estrogens can promote a build-up of the lining of the uterus (endometrial hyperplasia) and increase the risk of endometrial cancer. (Women who have undergone surgical removal of the uterus – hysterectomy - are not susceptible to endometrial hyperplasia.) The addition of a progestin to estrogen therapy prevents the development of endometrial cancer.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/2/2014


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