English Ivy

Understanding COPD

What other names is English Ivy known by?

Gum Ivy, Hedera helix, Hedera taurica, Hederae Helicis Folium, Herbes à Cors, Hiedra Común, Ivy, Lierre, Lierre Commun, Lierre Grimpant, True Ivy, Woodbind.

What is English Ivy?

English ivy is an herb. The leaves are used to make medicine. English ivy is most often used in the form of an extract and is seldom used as a prepared tea.

English ivy is used for disorders of the liver, spleen, and gallbladder; as well as for muscle spasms, gout, joint pain (rheumatism), chronic bronchitis, and tuberculosis.

It is also used for reducing swelling of the membranes that line the breathing passages and breaking up chest congestion (as an expectorant).

Some people apply English ivy directly to the skin for burns, calluses, under-skin infections (cellulitis), swelling, nerve pain, parasitic infections, ulcers, joint pain (rheumatism), and swollen veins (phlebitis).

Possibly Effective for...

  • Chronic bronchitis. There is some evidence that taking English ivy extract might help improve lung function in children with chronic bronchitis.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of English ivy for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

Quick GuideCOPD Lung Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

COPD Lung Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

How does English Ivy work?

English ivy leaves seem to be able to break up chest congestion and relieve muscle spasms. It seems to help breathing in children with chronic bronchitis.

Are there safety concerns?

English ivy taken by mouth appears to be safe for most adults. It can have a bitter taste.

There isn't enough information to know if English ivy is safe to apply directly to the skin. Fresh leaves can irritate the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of English ivy during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Dosing considerations for English Ivy.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For chronic obstructive bronchitis in children: 35 mg of English ivy dried leaf extract three times a day or 14 mg dried leaf alcohol-based extract three times a day.
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Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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