Upper Endoscopy (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, EGD)

  • Medical Author:
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

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When do I get the results of the endoscopy?

Under most circumstances, the examining physician will inform the patient of the test results or the probable findings prior to discharge from the recovery area. The results of biopsies or cytology usually take 72-96 hours and the doctor may only give the patient a presumptive diagnosis pending the definitive one, after the microscopic examination.

What are the risks of endoscopy?

Endoscopy is a safe procedure and when performed by a physician with specialized training in these procedures, the complications are extremely rare. They may include localized irritation of the vein where the medication was administered, reaction to the medication or sedatives used, complications from pre-existing heart, lung, or liver disease, bleeding may occur at the site of a biopsy or removal of a polyp (which if it occurs is almost always minor and rarely requires transfusions or surgery). Major complications such as perforation (punching a hole through the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum) are rare but usually require surgical repair.

What if there are still remaining questions about endoscopy?

If the patient has any questions about their need for this exam, the cost of this procedure and whether it is covered by the patient's insurance, methods of billing, or any concerns about this exam, speak to the doctor or his staff about them. Most endoscopists are highly trained specialists and will be happy to discuss their qualifications and answer any questions.

Medically reviewed by Martin E Zipser, MD; American Board of Surgery

REFERENCE:

UpToDate. Overview of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (esophagogastroduodenoscopy).

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/7/2015

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