Encephalitis and Meningitis

  • Medical Author:
    Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP

    Dr. Balentine received his undergraduate degree from McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland. He attended medical school at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine graduating in1983. He completed his internship at St. Joseph's Hospital in Philadelphia and his Emergency Medicine residency at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center in the Bronx, where he served as chief resident.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Meningitis Incubation Period

The incubation period for bacterial meningitis, the most serious types of meningitis, is about three to five days after initial contact with the microbe. However, in some individuals, bacterial meningitis symptoms can occur as rapidly as 24 hours. For viral meningitis, the incubation period can range widely from only a few days to a few weeks.

Encephalitis and meningitis facts

  • Encephalitis is inflammation of the brain.
  • Meningitis is inflammation of the membranes (meninges) that surround the brain and spinal cord.
  • Both encephalitis and meningitis can be caused by bacteria or viruses, and rarely a fungus, or be noninfectious.
  • Headache and fever are the most common symptoms of encephalitis and meningitis. Stiff neck, confusion, or lethargy can also be present.
  • The diagnosis is usually made by performing a lumbar puncture (spinal tap).
  • A CT scan or MRI of the brain can also be helpful but usually is only done in addition to the spinal tap.
  • Treatment depends on identifying the underlying cause. If bacteria are causing the infection, then antibiotics are indicated.
  • Anyone experiencing symptoms of encephalitis or meningitis should see a doctor immediately.
  • Depending on the organism causing the infection, close contacts can also become ill and need to be evaluated by a health-care professional.
  • Basic methods to prevent the spread of infections (hand washing and covering ones mouth when coughing) can also help prevent the spread of some forms of meningitis.
  • Being current on vaccinations will help prevent certain forms of meningitis.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/8/2016
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