Dupuytren's Contracture

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Dupuytren's contracture facts

  • A Dupuytren's contracture is a localized scar tissue formation in the palm.
  • The precise cause of a Dupuytren's contracture is not known.
  • A Dupuytren's contracture is sometimes inherited.
  • A Dupuytren's contracture can limit extension of the affected finger.
  • The treatment of a Dupuytren's contracture depends on the severity and the underlying condition of the affected individual. Treatments include stretching, heat, ultrasound, local cortisone injection, surgical procedures, and collagen injection.

What is a Dupuytren's contracture?

A Dupuytren's contracture is a localized formation of scar tissue around the tendons that flex the fingers beneath the skin of the palm of the hand. The scarring accumulates in a tissue (palmar fascia) that normally covers the tendons that pull the fingers to grip. As a Dupuytren's contracture progresses, more of the fascia becomes thickened and shortened. Dimpling and puckering of the skin over the area eventually occurs and ultimately can make it impossible to fully extend the hand (as in laying it flat on a tabletop).

How fast does a Dupuytren's contracture develop?

A Dupuytren's contracture varies in its rate of progression from minor skin puckering for many years to rapid contracture (fixed flexed position) of fingers.


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Dupuytren's Contracture Treatment Option

FDA Approves Xiaflex for Debilitating Hand Condition

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Xiaflex (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) as the first drug to treat a progressive hand disease known as Dupuytren's contracture, which can affect a person's ability to straighten and properly use their fingers.

Dupuytren's contracture affects the connective tissue found beneath the skin in the palm of the hand. Too much collagen can build up, forming thick, rope-like cords of tissue that can prevent the fingers from being able to relax and straighten normally. The disorder is most common in Caucasians and in men over age 50.

Xiaflex is a biologic drug made from the protein product of a living organism. It works by breaking down the excessive buildup of collagen in the hand.

"Before the FDA approved Xiaflex, the only effective treatment for this hand disorder was surgery, which sometimes meant a long recovery and the need for physical therapy for patients. Since there are no other non-surgical alternatives for Dupuytren's contracture, Xiaflex will be an important advance in the management of this disabling condition," said Bob Rappaport, M.D., director, Division of Anesthesiology, Analgesia, and Rheumatology of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

Xiaflex is injected directly into the collagen cord of the hand and should be administered only by a health care professional experienced with injections of the hand, because tendon ruptures may occur.

SOURCE: FDA


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