dornase alpha, Pulmozyme

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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GENERIC AVAILABLE: No

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Single-use ampules; 2.5 ml (1 mg/ml)

STORAGE: Dornase alpha must be kept in a refrigerator at 2 C to 8 C (36 F to 46 F) and protected from direct sunlight. The solution should be thrown away if it is cloudy or discolored. Since the ampule does not contain a preservative, the entire contents of the ampule must be used or thrown away after it is opened.

DOSING: The recommended dose is one ampule (2.5 ml) inhaled once or twice daily using a recommended nebulizer.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Drug interaction studies have not been conducted. Dornase alpha is compatible with standard cystic fibrosis therapies including oral, inhaled and/or parenteral antibiotics, bronchodilators, enzyme supplements, vitamins, oral or inhaled corticosteroids, and analgesics.

PREGNANCY: No damage has been noted to fetuses of pregnant animals exposed to high doses of dornase alpha. However, there are no studies in women. Therefore, physicians must weigh potential risks with the expected benefits of therapy when deciding whether or not to use dornase alpha in pregnancy.

NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known whether dornase alpha is secreted in human milk. At most, very little dornase alpha would be expected in human milk after long-term aerosol use. However, because many drugs are secreted in human milk, physicians must still use caution when they consider the use of dornase alpha in nursing women.

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/17/2015

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