Dizziness (Dizzy)

  • Medical Author:
    Benjamin Wedro, MD, FACEP, FAAEM

    Dr. Ben Wedro practices emergency medicine at Gundersen Clinic, a regional trauma center in La Crosse, Wisconsin. His background includes undergraduate and medical studies at the University of Alberta, a Family Practice internship at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and residency training in Emergency Medicine at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Balance Disorders: Vertigo, Migraines, Motion Sickness and More

Quick GuideBalance Disorders Pictures Slideshow: Vertigo, Migraines, Motion Sickness and More

Balance Disorders Pictures Slideshow: Vertigo, Migraines, Motion Sickness and More

What are the symptoms experienced when a person feels dizzy?

  • Lightheadedness is the feeling of weakness and faintness as if you are about to pass out. The symptoms tend to be short-lived, depending on the cause. There may be associated nausea, sweating, and blurred vision.
  • If the cause is dehydration or bleeding, the symptoms may worsen by standing quickly and may resolve somewhat by lying down (orthostatic hypotension)
  • Heart rhythm disturbances may occur without warning and may be associated with palpitations. This may come and go or it may persist. The heart beat may be felt as too fast (often described as a pounding or fluttering), too slow, and/or irregular.
  • Vertigo is the sensation of spinning and may present without warning and be associated with nausea and vomiting. People with inner ear problems may be debilitated and unable to move without generating symptoms.
  • People with a cerebellar cause of vertigo such as a stroke or tumor may have associated coordination problems or difficulty walking.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/27/2015

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