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diphtheria/tetanus/acellular pertussis (pediatric) - injection, Daptacel, Infanrix, Tripedia

GENERIC NAME: DIPHTHERIA/TETANUS/ACELLULAR PERTUSSIS (PEDIATRIC) - INJECTION (dip-THEER-ee-uh/TET-un-us/per-TUSS-iss)

BRAND NAME(S): Daptacel, Infanrix, Tripedia

Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage

USES: This medication is given to provide protection (immunity) against diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), and pertussis (whooping cough) in children between 6 weeks and 7 years old.Vaccination is the best way to protect against these life-threatening diseases. Vaccines work by causing the body to produce its own protection (antibodies). The vaccine is given in a series of doses to get the best protection. Closely follow the vaccination schedule provided by the doctor.

HOW TO USE: Read the Vaccine Information Statement available from your health care provider before receiving the vaccine. If you have any questions, consult your health care provider.This medication is given by injection into a muscle by a health care professional. It is usually given in the upper arm or upper thigh.Vaccination usually starts with an injection given every 2 months for the first 3 doses. A booster dose is given 6 to 12 months after the first 3 doses. A second booster dose is usually given before the child enters school at 4 to 6 years. Ask your child's doctor for a schedule of all your child's vaccinations. Follow this schedule closely. It may be helpful to mark a calendar as a reminder.This vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines (such as hepatitis B) using a separate needle and injection site.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/16/2014



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