digoxin, Lanoxin (cont.)

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PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 0.0625, 0.125, 0.1875, and 0.25 mg; Elixir: 0.05. Injectable Solution: 0.1 and 0.25 mg/ml.

STORAGE: Digoxin should be stored at room temperature, 15 C and 30 C) (59 F and 86 F) and protected from light.

PRESCRIBED FOR: Digoxin is used for mild to moderate congestive heart failure and for treating an atrial fibrillation, an abnormal heart rhythm.

DOSING: Digoxin may be taken with or without food. Digoxin is primarily eliminated by the kidneys; therefore, the dose of digoxin should be reduced in patients with kidney dysfunction. Digoxin blood levels are used for adjusting doses in order to avoid toxicity. The usual starting dose is 0.0625-0.25 mg daily depending on age and kidney function. The dose may be increased every two weeks to achieve the desired response. The usual maintenance dose is 0.125 to 0.5 mg per day.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Drugs such as verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Isoptin SR, Covera-HS), quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinide), amiodarone (Cordarone), indomethacin (Indocin, Indocin-SR), alprazolam (Xanax, Xanax XR, Niravam), spironolactone (Aldactone), and itraconazole (Sporanox) can increase digoxin levels and the risk of toxicity. The co-administration of digoxin and beta-blockers (for example propranolol [Inderal, Inderal LA]) or calcium channel blockers or CCBs (for example, verapamil), which also reduces heart rate, can cause serious slowing of the heart rate.

Diuretic-induced (for example, by furosemide [Lasix]) reduction in blood potassium or magnesium levels may predispose patients to digoxin-induced abnormal heart rhythms.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/31/2014


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