Diabetes Prevention (Type 2 Diabetes)

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Type 2 Diabetes: Learn the Warning Signs

Quick GuideDiabetes Pictures Slideshow: 20 Reasons for Blood Sugar Swings

Diabetes Pictures Slideshow: 20 Reasons for Blood Sugar Swings

What is type 2 diabetes?

There are two major forms of diabetes - type 1 and type 2. This article focuses specifically on the prevention of type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes is virtually a pandemic in the United States. This information reviews the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes and reviews key points regarding prediction of those at risk for type 2 diabetes. It also is a review of what they can do about it.

While diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar values, type 2 diabetes is also associated with a condition known as insulin resistance. Even though there is an element of impaired insulin secretion from the beta cells of the pancreas, especially when toxic levels of glucose occur (when blood sugars are constantly very high), the major defect in type 2 diabetes is the body's inability to respond properly to insulin.

Eventually, even though the pancreas is working at its best to produce more and more insulin, the body tissues (for example, muscle and fat cells) do not respond and become insensitive to the insulin. At this point, overt diabetes occurs as the body is no longer able to effectively use its insulin to maintain normal blood sugar levels. Over time, these high levels of sugar result in the complications we see all too often in patients with diabetes.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/14/2016

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Diabetes Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

VIEW PATIENT COMMENTS
  • Diabetes Prevention - Risk Factors

    Are you concerned that you may have the risk factors for diabetes? What steps have you taken to decrease your risk?

    Post
  • Diabetes Prevention - Symptoms

    What were your symptoms associated with diabetes?

    Post View 1 Comment
  • Diabetes Prevention - Medications

    What medications are you currently taken, or have taken in the past to help prevent type 2 diabetes?

    Post
  • Diabetes Prevention - Diet

    What diet changes have you found to help lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes?

    Post
  • Diabetes Prevention - Experience

    Please share your experience with preventing diabetes, for example, diet or other lifestyle changes such as exercise.

    Post

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors