dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, Dextrostat, ProCentra, Zenzedi) (cont.)

Pharmacy Author:
Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

Blood pressure and heart rate may increase, and patients may experience heart palpitations.

Sudden death, stroke, heart attack, depression, manic episodes, aggressive behavior or hostility, psychosis, growth suppression (long-term use), dependence, and withdrawal symptoms also may occur.

Priapism defined as painful and non-painful penile erection lasting more than 4 hours, has been reported in pediatric and adult patients treated with stimulants. The erection usually resolves when the drug is stopped. Prompt medical attention is required in the event of suspected priapism.

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 5, 10, and 15 mg. Extended-release capsules: 5, 10, and 15 mg.

STORAGE: Dextroamphetamine tablets and capsules should be stored between 20 C and 25 C (68 F and 77 F).

DOSING:

ADHD

  • Adults with ADHD are treated with 5 mg once daily or every 12 hours. The dose may be increased weekly by 5 mg/day up to a maximum dose of 40 mg/day.
  • Children with ADHD should receive 2.5 to 5 mg daily or every 12 hours. The dose may be increased by 2.5 to 5 mg/day weekly. The maximum dose is 40 mg daily.

Narcolepsy

  • The dose for adults and adolescents older than 12 years of age is 10 mg daily, but the dose may be increased weekly to a maximum of 60 mg daily.

DRUG INTERACTIONS:

Amphetamines should not be taken with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor drugs including phenelzine (Nardil) and tranylcypromine (Parnate), or with linezolid (Zyvox); use of amphetamine within 14 days of using MAO inhibitor drugs should be avoided.

Patients receiving high blood pressure medications may experience loss of blood pressure control with amphetamine.

Antacids may increase absorption of amphetamine salts and increase their effectiveness and side effects.

PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of dextroamphetamine use during pregnancy to determine its safety in pregnant females.

NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known whether dextroamphetamine is secreted into breast milk.

REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/23/2014


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