Depression in the Elderly

Clinical depression in the elderly is common. Although, that doesn't mean it's normal. Late-life depression affects about 6 million Americans age 65 and older. But only 10% receive treatment for depression. The likely reason is that the elderly often display symptoms of depression differently. Depression in the elderly is also frequently confused with the effects of multiple illnesses and the medicines used to treat them.

How does depression in the elderly differ from depression in younger adults?

Depression impacts older people differently than younger people. In the elderly, depression often occurs with other medical illnesses and disabilities and lasts longer.

Depression in the elderly often increases their risk of cardiac diseases. Depression doubles an elderly person's risk of cardiac diseases and increases their risk of death from illness. At the same time, depression reduces an elderly person's ability to rehabilitate. Studies of nursing home patients with physical illnesses have shown that the presence of depression substantially increases the likelihood of death from those illnesses. Depression also has been associated with increased risk of death following a heart attack. For that reason, making sure that an elderly person you are concerned about is evaluated and treated is important, even if the depression is mild.

Depression also increases the risk of suicide, especially elderly white men. The suicide rate in people ages 80 to 84 is more than twice that of the general population. The National Institute of Mental Health considers depression in people age 65 and older to be a major public health problem.

In addition, advancing age is often accompanied by loss of social support systems due to the death of a spouse or siblings, retirement, or relocation of residence. Because of changes in an elderly person's circumstances and the fact that elderly people are expected to slow down, doctors and family may miss the signs of depression. As a result, effective treatment often gets delayed, forcing many elderly people unnecessarily struggle with depression.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/17/2012

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Get the facts on the symptoms of depression.

Depression Symptoms

Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
Medical Editor: Dennis Lee, MD

Depression is a very common condition that is believed by many experts to be the number one cause of disability in the world. In the U.S., 17% of people will experience depression at some point in their lives. An estimated 19 million people in the U.S. are currently suffering from depression. Depression is more common in women then in men, with 25% of women suffering from depression severe enough to warrant treatment at least once during their lifetime.

It's important to remember that depression is an illness that affects both the body and mind. It is not something that we can just wish away or "snap out of," nor is it a sign of a weak character. The good news about depression is that almost everyone suffering from this condition can be helped with treatment, so it is important to recognize the signs and symptoms of depression.

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