Cystocele (Fallen Bladder) (cont.)

How is a cystocele diagnosed?

A doctor may be able to diagnose a grade 2 or grade 3 cystocele from a description of symptoms and from physical examination of the vagina because the fallen part of the bladder will be visible. Other tests may be needed to find or rule out problems in other parts of the urinary system.

How is a cystocele treated?

Treatment options range from no treatment for a mild cystocele to surgery for a serious cystocele. If a cystocele is not bothersome, the doctor may only recommend avoiding heavy lifting or straining that could cause the cystocele to worsen. If symptoms are moderately bothersome, the doctor may recommend a pessary -- a device placed in the vagina to hold the bladder in place. Pessaries come in a variety of shapes and sizes to allow the doctor to find the most comfortable fit for the patient. Pessaries must be removed regularly to avoid infection or ulcers.

Large cystoceles may require surgery to move and keep the bladder in a more normal position. This operation may be performed by a gynecologist, a urologist, or a urogynecologist. The most common procedure for cystocele repair is for the surgeon to make an incision in the wall of the vagina and repair the area by tightening the layers of tissue that separate the organs, creating more support for the bladder. The patient may stay in the hospital for several days and take 4 to 6 weeks to recover fully.

For More Information

American Urological Association Foundation
1000 Corporate Boulevard
Linthicum, MD 21090
Phone: 1–866–RING–AUA (746–4282) or 410–689–3700
Fax: 410–689–3800
Email: patienteducation@auafoundation.org
Internet: www.auafoundation.org
www.UrologyHealth.org

American Urogynecologic Society
2025 M Street NW, Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202–367–1167
Fax: 202–367–2167
Email: info@augs.org
Internet: www.augs.org

National Association for Continence
P.O. Box 1019
Charleston, SC 29402–1019
Phone: 1–800–BLADDER (252–3337) or 843–377–0900
Fax: 843–377–0905
Email: memberservices@nafc.org
Internet: www.nafc.org

Medically reviewed by Steven Nelson, MD; Board Certified Obstetrics and Gynecology

SOURCE: National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse, National Institutes of Health (www.nih.gov). Last update: 8/1/2007


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/15/2014

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