Costochondritis and Tietze's Syndrome

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

  • Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

What is the treatment for costochondritis and Tietze's syndrome?

Costochondritis can be aggravated by any activity that involves stressing the structures of the front of the chest cage. It is generally best to minimize these activities until the inflammation of the rib and cartilage areas has subsided.

Rest, anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, and cortisone injections have been used by doctors treating the inflammation and chest wall pain of both costochondritis and Tietze's syndrome.

What are home remedies for costochondritis and Tietze's syndrome?

Ice packs applied to local swelling can sometimes help to reduce chest pain and inflammation. Local lidocaine analgesic patch (Lidoderm) application can reduce pain.

What is the prognosis for costochondritis and Tietze's syndrome?

The outlook for costochondritis and Tietze's syndrome is generally very good. Most patients respond well to conservative treatments. Recurrences are more likely in those who also have underlying rheumatologic diseases as described above.

Is it possible to prevent costochondritis and Tietze's syndrome?

Costochondritis and Tietze's syndrome cannot be prevented. Although aggravating the symptoms can be minimized by avoiding injury to the chest wall.

REFERENCE:

Firestein, Gary S., et al. Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology, Ninth Edition. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders, 2013.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/7/2016

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