Corns

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideCommon Causes of Foot Pain

Common Causes of Foot Pain

What is the prognosis for corns and calluses?

Corns and calluses are not serious conditions and can be managed with home remedies or medical treatment. Surgery is very rarely necessary. However, even with management, corns and calluses may recur if there is continued pressure or friction on the affected area. Corns and calluses are benign conditions that do not increase the risk of skin cancer or other serious conditions.

Is it possible to prevent corns and calluses?

In many situations, calluses and corns can be prevented by reducing or eliminating the circumstances that lead to increased pressure at specific points on the hands and feet. Potential preventive measures therefore include the following:

  1. Wearing well-fitting comfortable shoes is useful. The idea is to avoid having footgear press on the outside of the fifth toe or pressing the fourth and fifth toes together to prevent corns in these areas.
  2. Another approach is to pad the potentially affected area. Many sorts of padding are available at the drugstore:
  • Cushions to put between the toes
  • Foam or moleskin pads to put over the places where corns form
  • Foam pads with holes in the center (shaped like donuts or bagels), which redistribute pressure around the corn instead of right over it
  • Cushioned insoles to pad the feet and alleviate mechanical pressure
Reviewed on 6/19/2017
References
REFERENCES:

Hogan, Daniel J. "Corns." Medscape. Sept. 30, 2016. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1089807-overview>.

Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.

IMAGES:

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2."Corns" by Marionette / iStock

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