Corns

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideCommon Causes of Foot Pain

Common Causes of Foot Pain

When should someone seek professional treatment for corns or calluses?

If the corn is bothersome and doesn't respond to salicylic acid and trimming, consider seeing a physician or podiatrist who can physically pare corns with scalpels. Podiatrists also can measure and fit people with orthotic devices to redistribute their weight on their feet while they walk so that pressure from the foot bones doesn't focus on their corns. (Off-the-shelf cushioned insoles are one size fits all and may not be effective.)

People with fragile skin or poor circulation in the feet (including many people with diabetes or peripheral arterial disease) should consult their health-care professional as soon as corns or calluses develop. Further, someone should seek medical care immediately if corns or calluses show signs of infection (such as increasing pain, the presence of pus or other drainage, swelling, and redness).

Surgical removal of corns is rarely necessary. When a corn is surgically removed, the pressure that caused it to form in the first place will just make it come back if this pressure is not removed or reduced. When necessary, surgery for corns involves shaving the underlying bone or correcting any deformity that is causing undue pressure or friction on the skin.

What kind of doctor treats corns and calluses?

Primary-care specialists, including internal-medicine and family medicine specialists, treat corns and calluses. Podiatrists, medical practitioners specially trained in management of foot disorders, also treat corns and calluses of the feet. Surgeons may also sometimes treat corns and calluses.

Reviewed on 4/26/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Hogan, Daniel J. "Corns." Medscape.com. Sept. 18, 2014. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1089807-overview>.

Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.

IMAGES:

1.iStock

2."Corns" by Marionette / iStock

3.Getty Images

4.Getty Images

5.Getty Images

6.Getty Images

7.Getty Images

8.Getty Images

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Newsletters

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors