Corns

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Corns and Other Common Causes of Foot Pain

Because we expose our feet to potential injury in our daily lives by walking, we have all experienced pains in the feet at one time or another. There are many common causes of foot pains, such as blisters and corns. There are also less common causes of foot pain, such as sciatica and osteomyelitis. Treatments for foot pain depend on the particular cause.

Picture of Corns and Calluses

Quick GuideCommon Causes of Foot Pain

Common Causes of Foot Pain

Corns and calluses facts

  • Corns and calluses are annoying and sometimes painful thickenings in the skin in areas of repeated pressure.
  • Symptoms and signs of corns and calluses include
    • a thick, hard patch of skin;
    • bump on the skin;
    • area of flaky, dry skin;
    • pain or tenderness of the affected area.
  • Corns and calluses can be treated with many types of medicated products to chemically pare down the thickened, dead skin.
  • Salicylic acid is the ingredient used in most corn and callus removal products.
  • Corns and calluses can be prevented by reducing or eliminating the circumstances that lead to increased pressure at specific points on the hands and feet.
  • People with fragile skin or poor circulation in the feet (including many people with diabetes or peripheral arterial disease) should consult their health-care professional as soon as corns or calluses develop. Continue Reading
Reviewed on 4/26/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Hogan, Daniel J. "Corns." Medscape.com. Sept. 18, 2014. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1089807-overview>.

Kasper, D., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Professional, 2015.

IMAGES:

1. iStock

2. "Corns" by Marionette / iStock

3. Getty Images

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