Coriolus Mushroom

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What other names is Coriolus Mushroom known by?

Bolet à Couleurs Variées, Bolet Versicolore, Boletus versicolor, Champignon Coriolus, Champignon de Queue de Dinde, Coriolus, Coriolus versicolor, Hongo Coriolus, Kawaratake, Krestin, Polypore à Couleurs Variées, Polypore Versicolor, Polyporus Versicolor, Polysaccharide-K, Polysaccharide Krestin, Polysaccharide Peptide, Polysaccharopeptide, Polystictus versicolor, PSK, PSP, Trametes versicolor, Turkey Tail, Yun Zhi, Yun-Zhi (cloud mushroom).

What is Coriolus Mushroom?

Coriolus mushroom is a fungus. People have used the fruiting body and other parts as folk medicine for a long time. Recently, researchers have started to isolate and identify substances in coriolus that might act like pharmaceutical drugs. Two of these substances are polysaccharide peptide (PSP) and polysaccharide krestin (PSK). Scientists think these chemicals might be able to fight cancer and boost the immune system.

Coriolus mushroom, PSP, and PSK are used for stimulating the immune system; treating herpes, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), hepatitis, and pulmonary disorders; reducing phlegm; improving bodybuilding results; increasing energy; curing ringworm and a skin condition called impetigo; treating upper respiratory, urinary, and digestive tract infections; curing liver disorders including hepatitis; reducing the toxic effects and pain of chemotherapy and radiation therapy; increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy; prolonging life and raising the quality of life of cancer patients; and increasing appetite.

Possibly Effective for...

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of coriolus mushroom for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

How does Coriolus Mushroom work?

Coriolus contains polysaccharide peptide (PSP) and polysaccharide-K (PSK, krestin), which may be able to fight tumor growth as well as boost the immune system.

Are there safety concerns?

Coriolus mushroom is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth appropriately. There have been no reported side effects so far. However, people who have received chemotherapy and a chemical called PSK (which is extracted from coriolus mushroom) have experienced nausea, low white blood cell counts, and liver problems. It is unclear if these side effects were due to the chemotherapy or PSK.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking coriolus mushroom if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Dosing considerations for Coriolus Mushroom.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For cancer, in addition to chemotherapy: 3 grams of PSK, the ingredient that is thought to fight cancer, is taken daily.
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Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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