Condoms (cont.)

When Should a Man Use a Condom?

Take caution when opening the wrapper to avoid tearing the condom with your teeth, fingernails or rings. Gently pinch the air out of the tip of the condom before putting it on. The condom is rolled over the erect penis before sexual activity begins. If the condom does not have a built-in nipple, leave about 1/2-inch of the condom free at the tip of the penis so that semen has a place to collect.

A new condom must be used each time you have sex. The condom must be in place before the penis gets near the vagina. If you use lubricants with a condom, be sure to only use water-based lubricants, such as K-Y Jelly. Oil-based lubricants, such as Vaseline, massage oils and body lotions can cause condoms to leak or break. Certain vaginal medications used to treat yeast infections can also weaken condoms.

Initially it was felt that condoms lubricated with spermicidal agents offered more protection against STDs. Newer studies show that frequent use of condoms containing spermicides offers no additional protection and it may actually increase the risk of a href="/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=263">HIV and other STDs by irritating the vagina and penis. Spermicidal products do however remain useful in pregnancy prevention.

How Is the Male Condom Used?

Take caution when opening the wrapper to avoid tearing the condom with your teeth, fingernails or rings. Gently pinch the air out of the tip of the condom before putting it on. The condom is rolled over the erect penis before sexual activity begins. If the condom does not have a built-in nipple, leave about 1/2-inch of the condom free at the tip of the penis so that semen has a place to collect.

A new condom must be used each time you have sex. The condom must be in place before the penis gets near the vagina. If you use lubricants with a condom, be sure to only use water-based lubricants, such as K-Y Jelly. Oil-based lubricants, such as Vaseline, massage oils and body lotions can cause condoms to leak or break. Certain vaginal medications used to treat yeast infections can also weaken condoms.

Initially it was felt that condoms lubricated with spermicidal agents offered more protection against STDs. Newer studies show that frequent use of condoms containing spermicides offers no additional protection and it may actually increase the risk of HIV and other STDs by irritating the vagina and penis. Spermicidal products do however remain useful in pregnancy prevention.

© 2005-2014 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.
Source article on WebMD



STAY INFORMED

Get the Latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!