Colloidal Minerals

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What other names is Colloidal Minerals known by?

Anhydrous aluminum silicates, Bioelectrical Minerals, Clay Suspension Products, Colloidal Trace Minerals, Humic Shale, Minerales Coloidales, Minéraux Colloïdaux, Oligo-Éléments Colloïdaux, Plant-Derived Liquid Minerals, Schiste Humique.

What is Colloidal Minerals?

Colloidal minerals are taken from clay or shale deposits. Historically, some Native American tribes used clay as medicine. The medicinal use of clay-based products in modern days was first encouraged by a southern Utah rancher. Now colloidal minerals are widely promoted.

Despite safety concerns, colloidal minerals are used as a supplemental source of trace minerals and as a dietary supplement to increase energy. They are also used for improving blood sugar levels in diabetes, treating arthritis symptoms, reducing blood cell clumping, reversing early cataracts, turning gray hair dark again, flushing poisonous heavy metals from the body, improving general well-being, and reducing aches and pains.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Mineral deficiencies.
  • Low energy.
  • Diabetes.
  • Arthritis.
  • Reducing blood cell clumping.
  • Reversing early cataracts.
  • Turning gray hair dark again.
  • Flushing poisonous heavy metals from the body.
  • Improving general well-being.
  • Reducing aches and pains.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of colloidal minerals for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does Colloidal Minerals work?

There isn't enough information to know how colloidal minerals might work. Despite claims that colloidal minerals are more usable by the body than other minerals, there isn't any evidence to support this idea.

Are there safety concerns?

Colloidal minerals is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for use. The content of these products varies, depending on the source of the clay. Some products might contain metals such as aluminum, arsenic, lead, barium, nickel, and titanium in potentially harmful amounts. There is also concern that some products might contain radioactive metals.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use colloidal minerals if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. There is concern about the metals some products might contain. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Too much iron in the body (hemochromatosis): Hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder. If you have this condition, taking colloidal minerals might make it worse.

Inability to use copper (Wilson's disease): Wilson's disease is an inherited disorder. If you have this condition, taking colloidal minerals might make it worse.

Dosing considerations for Colloidal Minerals.

The appropriate dose of colloidal minerals depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for colloidal minerals. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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