Cluster Headaches

  • Medical Author:
    Danette C. Taylor, DO, MS, FACN

    Dr. Taylor has a passion for treating patients as individuals. In practice since 1994, she has a wide range of experience in treating patients with many types of movement disorders and dementias. In addition to patient care, she is actively involved in the training of residents and medical students, and has been both primary and secondary investigator in numerous research studies through the years. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Michigan State University's College of Osteopathic Medicine (Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology). She graduated with a BS degree from Alma College, and an MS (biomechanics) from Michigan State University. She received her medical degree from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. Her internship and residency were completed at Botsford General Hospital. Additionally, she completed a fellowship in movement disorders with Dr. Peter LeWitt. She has been named a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychiatrists. She is board-certified in neurology by the American Osteopathic Board of Neurology and Psychiatry. She has authored several articles and lectured extensively; she continues to write questions for two national medical boards. Dr. Taylor is a member of the Medical and Scientific Advisory Council (MSAC) of the Alzheimer's Association of Michigan, and is a reviewer for the journal Clinical Neuropharmacology.

  • Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

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Headache Pictures Slideshow: Surprising Headache and Migraine Triggers

What causes cluster headaches?

The specific cause and anatomic origination of cluster headaches isn't known. MRI studies suggest dilation of the ophthalmic artery during an acute cluster headache, while PET scans reveal activity within the cavernous sinus. However, many patients with other headache types also have revealed abnormalities in similar regions, so these tests aren't definitive. There is some evidence that the hypothalamus may be involved in the recurrence cycle of cluster headaches. Activation of the trigeminal ganglion can cause many changes associated with cluster headache, but the trigger for activation of this region hasn't been identified.

What triggers cluster headaches?

Many patients report their headaches begin while sleeping. Additionally, alcohol can trigger cluster headaches in patients who are in the midst of a cycle. Histamines and nitroglycerin can trigger cluster headaches in patients. Seasonal variation has been described, although this is inconsistent for many patients. Some patients have clusters precipitated by environmental changes or changes in stress or activity levels. Hormonal factors, or menstruation, do not seem to trigger cluster headache. Other risk factors include smoking and a family history of the problem.

How are cluster headaches diagnosed?

The diagnosis of cluster headache is typically made after the history of headaches has been explored and a physical examination is completed. Cluster headaches are unique in their presentation, and often the history is sufficient to make the diagnosis. While no imaging study or specific blood test can confirm the diagnosis of cluster headache, an MRI or CT scan of the brain may be ordered to confirm that there are no other contributing factors that may mimic cluster headache symptoms. In some cases, ophthalmologic evaluation is needed to exclude problems within the eye itself that may be causing symptoms.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/2/2015
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