clotrimazole, Lotrimin (discontinued), Mycelex, Lotrimin-AF, Gyne-Lotrimin (cont.)

Pharmacy Author:
Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

DOSING: The troche (lozenge) should slowly dissolve in the mouth. One troche is administered 5 times daily for 14 days. Clotrimazole cream, lotion, or solution is applied to the affected and surrounding skin areas, generally twice daily in the morning and evening.

The vaginal cream is inserted via applicator once daily, preferably at night, for 7 consecutive days.

The 100 mg vaginal suppository is inserted once daily, preferably at bedtime, for 7 consecutive days.

The 200 mg vaginal suppository is inserted once daily for 3 days, preferably at bedtime.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: There are no known drug interactions with topical clotrimazole. Oral clotrimazole may increase the action of warfarin (Coumadin), increasing the risk of bleeding. It may also increase levels of axitinib (Inlyta), a drug used for treating some cancers.

PREGNANCY: Clotrimazole is very poorly absorbed into the blood and the body after application to the skin or the vagina. Studies in women in their second or third trimesters of pregnancy have demonstrated no ill effects. No data is available in pregnant women during their first trimester. Rats given large amounts of clotrimazole via the vagina have demonstrated no ill effects. The oral troche has not been adequately evaluated in pregnant women.

NURSING MOTHERS: It is not known if clotrimazole is secreted in breast milk.

SIDE EFFECTS: The most commonly noted side effects associated with clotrimazole are local redness, stinging, blistering, peeling, swelling, itching, hives, or burning at the area of application. The oral forms may cause nausea and vomiting.

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/26/2013


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