ciprofloxacin, Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR (cont.)

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Many antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, can alter the normal bacteria in the colon and encourage overgrowth of a bacterium responsible for the development of inflammation of the colon (pseudomembranous colitis). Patients who develop signs of pseudomembranous colitis after starting ciprofloxacin (diarrhea, fever, abdominal pain, and possibly shock) should contact their physician. Patients taking ciprofloxacin can develop sensitivity of the skin to direct sunlight (photosensitivity) and should avoid exposure to sunlight or use sun protection and sunscreens.

Ciprofloxacin as well as other antibiotics in the fluoroquinolone class of antibiotics, has been associated with tendinitis and even rupture of tendons, particularly the Achilles tendon. Some physicians recommend that their patients discontinue vigorous exercise while they are taking fluoroquinolone antibiotics.

Fluoroquinolones have neuromuscular blocking activity and can worsen muscle weakness in individuals with myasthenia gravis. Ciprofloxacin may worsen low blood glucose when combined with sulfonylureas (for example, glyburide).




  • Tablets: 250, 500, and 750 mg.
  • Tablets extended release (XR): 500 and 1000 mg.
  • Microcapsules for suspension: 250 mg/5 ml, 500 mg/5 ml.
  • Injection or Injection concentrate: 200 mg/100 ml, 200 mg/20 mg, 400 mg/200 ml, 400 mg/40 ml.

STORAGE: Tablets should be stored below 30 C (86 F). Extended release tablets should be stored between 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F). Microcapsules should be stored below 25 C (77 F) and protected from freezing. Injections should be stored between 5 C to 30 C (41 F to 86 F) and prevented from freezing.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/12/2014

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