cimetidine, Tagamet HB

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

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Major side effects include confusion and hallucinations (usually in elderly or critically ill patients), enlargement of the breasts; impotence (usually seen in patients on high doses for prolonged periods); decreased white blood cell counts.

Other side effects include:

PRESCRIPTION: Yes and OTC (Heart Burn)

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 200, 300, 400, and 800 mg. Liquid: 300 mg/5 ml. Injection: 150 mg/ml.

STORAGE: Store at room temperature 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F).

DOSING:

Duodenal ulcers are treated with 800 to 1600 mg at bedtime or 300 mg 4 times a day at meal times and bedtime, or 400 mg twice a day for 4-6 weeks. Maintenance therapy is 400 mg at bedtime.

Active gastric ulcers are treated with 800 mg at bedtime or 300 mg 4 times a day at meal times and bedtime for up to 8 weeks.

The regimen for GERD is 800 mg twice a day or 400 mg 4 times a day for 12 weeks.

Pathological hypersecretory conditions are treated with 300 mg 4 times daily up to 2400 mg daily.

Heartburn, indigestion and/or sour stomach may be treated with 200 mg once or twice daily and may be administered up to 30 minutes before ingestion of food or beverages that may cause heartburn.

For hospitalized patients who cannot take oral medications, 300 mg of cimetidine may be administered by intravenous or intramuscular injection every 6-8 hours. A continuous intravenous infusion of 37.5 to 50 mg/hour also may be used.

Other dosages of IV or IM cimetidine may be used for erosive esophagitis, upper GI bleeding or other conditions; use in these situations may be best determined by a GI specialist.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/14/2015

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