Chrysin

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What other names is Chrysin known by?

5,7-Chrysin, 5,7-Dihydroxyflavone, Chrysine, Flavone X, Flavonoid, Flavonoïde, Galangin Flavanone, Galangine Flavanone.

What is Chrysin?

Chrysin belongs to a class of chemicals called flavonoids. It occurs naturally in plants such as the passionflower, silver linden, and some geranium species; and in honey and bee propolis (glue).

Chrysin is used for bodybuilding; for treating anxiety, inflammation, gout, HIV/AIDS, erectile dysfunction (ED), and baldness; and for preventing cancer.

Possibly Ineffective for...

  • Athletic performance. Taking chrysin by mouth in combination with steroids and other supplements for 8 weeks does not seem to be effective for enhancing resistance training in athletes.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of chrysin for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does Chrysin work?

Athletes are interested in chrysin for bodybuilding because laboratory research suggested that chrysin might increase the male hormone called testosterone and improve bodybuilding results. But research in humans hasn't found any effect on testosterone levels. The amount of chrysin that is absorbed from the intestine may be very small, which would make treatment effects unlikely.

Are there safety concerns?

Chrysin is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth for up to 8 weeks. No adverse effects have been reported.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking chrysin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorder: Chrysin might increase bleeding. There is some concern that it might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Surgery: Chrysin might slow blood clotting. There is concern that it might increase the risk of extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking chrysin at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Some birth control pills contain estrogen. Chrysin might decrease the effects of estrogen in the body. Taking chrysin along with birth control pills might decrease the effectiveness of birth control pills. If you take birth control pills along with chrysin, use an additional form of birth control such as a condom.

Some birth control pills include ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Triphasil), ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Ortho-Novum 1/35, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7), and others.



Estrogens
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Chrysin seems to decrease the effects of estrogen in the body. Taking chrysin along with estrogen pills might decrease the effectiveness of estrogen pills.

Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.



Medications for estrogen sensitive cancers (Aromatase inhibitors)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Some types of cancer are affected by hormones in the body. Estrogen-sensitive cancers are cancers that are affected by estrogen levels in the body. Medications for estrogen sensitive cancers help decrease estrogen in the body. Chrysin might also decrease estrogen in the body. Taking chrysin along with medications for estrogen-sensitive cancers might decrease estrogen in the body too much.

Some medications for estrogen-sensitive cancers include aminoglutethimide (Cytadren), anastrozole (Arimidex), exemestane (Aromasin), letrozole (Femara), and others.



Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Using chrysin with medications that slow clotting might increase the risk of bleeding.

Some of these drugs include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dalteparin (Fragmin), dipyridamole (Persantine), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, ticlopidine (Ticlid), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.



Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Chrysin might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking chrysin along with some medications that are changed by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking chrysin, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include clozapine (Clozaril), cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), fluvoxamine (Luvox), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), mexiletine (Mexitil), olanzapine (Zyprexa), pentazocine (Talwin), propranolol (Inderal), tacrine (Cognex), theophylline, zileuton (Zyflo), zolmitriptan (Zomig), and others.



Medications changed by the liver (Glucuronidated drugs)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

The body breaks down some medications to get rid of them. The liver helps break down these medications. Chrysin might increase how quickly some medications are changed by the liver. This could decrease how well some of these medications work.

Some of these medications changed by the liver include acetaminophen, atorvastatin (Lipitor), diazepam (Valium), digoxin, entacapone (Comtan), estrogen, irinotecan (Camptosar), lamotrigine (Lamictal), lorazepam (Ativan), lovastatin (Mevacor), meprobamate, morphine, oxazepam (Serax), and others.

Dosing considerations for Chrysin.

The appropriate dose of chrysin depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for chrysin. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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