Chlorella

How does Chlorella work?

Chlorella is a good source of protein, fats, carbohydrates, fiber, chlorophyll, vitamins, and minerals. The cell wall of chlorella must be broken down before people can digest it.

Are there safety concerns?

Chlorella is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth, short-term (up to 2 months). The most common side effects include diarrhea, nausea, gas (flatulence), green discoloration of the stools, and stomach cramping, especially in the first week of use.

Chlorella has caused serious allergic reactions, including asthma and other dangerous breathing problems.

Chlorella can cause skin to become extra sensitive to the sun. Wear sunblock outside, especially if you are light-skinned.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking chlorella if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Iodine sensitivity: Chlorella can contain iodine. Therefore, chlorella might cause an allergic reaction in people sensitive to iodine.

Allergy to molds: Chlorella might cause an allergic reaction in people who are also allergic to molds.

Weak immune system (immunodeficiency): There is a concern that chlorella might cause "bad" bacteria to take over in the intestine of people who have a weak immune system. Be careful with chlorella if you have this problem.

"Autoimmune diseases" such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Chlorella might cause the immune system to become more active, and this could increase the symptoms of autoimmune diseases. If you have one of these conditions, it's best to avoid using chlorella.


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