Cellulitis

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

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Where does cellulitis occur?

Cellulitis may occur anywhere on the body; the legs are a common location. The lower leg is the most common site of the infection (particularly in the area of the tibia or shinbone and in the foot; see the illustration below), followed by the arm, and then the head and neck areas. In special circumstances, such as following surgery or trauma wounds, cellulitis can develop in the abdomen or chest areas. People with morbid obesity can also develop cellulitis in the abdominal skin. Special types of cellulitis are sometimes designated by the location of the infection. Examples include periorbital and orbital cellulitis (around the eye socket), buccal (cheek) cellulitis, facial cellulitis, and perianal cellulitis.

Reviewed on 6/12/2017
References
REFERENCE:

Herchline, Thomas E. "Cellulitis." Medscape. Aug. 15, 2016. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/214222-overview>.

IMAGES:

1.Bigstock

2.MedicineNet

3.MedicineNet

4.iStock

5.Rafael Lopez

6.iStock, Medscape

7.CDC - Janice Carr

8.BigStock

9.iStock

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