Gluten-Free Diet

  • Author:
    Betty Kovacs Harbolic, MS, RD

    Betty is a Registered Dietitian who earned her B.S. degree in Food and Nutrition from Marymount College of Fordham University and her M.S. degree in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She is the Co-Director and Director of nutrition for the New York Obesity Research Center Weight Loss Program.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideGluten-Free Diet: Popular Gluten-Free Foods in Pictures

Gluten-Free Diet: Popular Gluten-Free Foods in Pictures

Foods that are unsafe to eat

  • Barley
  • Bleached flour
  • Bran Brewer's yeast
  • Bromated flour
  • Bulgur
  • Couscous
  • Durum flour
  • Enriched flour
  • FarinaFarro
  • Germ
  • Graham
  • Flour
  • Hydrolyzed protein
  • Malt or malt flavoring (can be made from barley)
  • Malt vinegar (made from barley)
  • Matzo meal/flour
  • OrzoPanko
  • Phosphated flour
  • Plain flour
  • RyeSeitan
  • Self-rising flour
  • Semolina
  • Tabouli
  • Teriyaki sauce
  • Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
  • Udon
  • Wheat
    • Einkorn
    • Emmer
    • SpeltKamut
    • Wheat starch
    • Wheat bran
    • Wheat germ
    • Cracked wheat
    • Hydrolyzed wheat protein
  • White flour

There are many other products that contain gluten that you will also need to avoid unless they are clearly labeled as gluten-free. Read the labels on each of these:

  • Beer and other grain-based alcohol
  • Breading
  • Brown rice syrup
  • Candies
  • Cakes/pies
  • Caramel color
  • Cereals
  • Communion wafers
  • Couscous
  • Croutons
  • Dairy substitutes
  • Dextrin
  • Dry roasted nuts
  • French fries
  • Gravy
  • Herbs
  • Hydrolyzed vegetable protein
  • Imitation seafood or meat
  • Lipstick, lip gloss, chapstick
  • Luncheon meats
  • Malt flavoring
  • Matzo
  • Modified food starch
  • Pasta
  • Play clay
  • Postage stamp
  • Poultry, self-basting
  • Rice with seasoning
  • Salad dressings
  • Sauces
  • Seasonings
  • Snack foods with seasonings (chips)
  • Soups, bouillon, broths
  • Soy sauce
  • Supplements
  • Toothpaste
  • Vegetables in sauce
  • Vitamins
  • Wheat-free products - this does not mean gluten-free so you still need to read the list of ingredients
  • Medications - gluten containing fillers can be found in some prescription and over-the-counter medications. You can check the list of ingredients, ask the pharmacist or your doctor, and/or use the resource at the end for more information. You can even contact the manufacturer of the medication to ask.

Cross-contamination is a potential problem that needs to be monitored. Whenever products containing gluten touch a bowl, utensil, or cutting board there is a risk of it getting into the gluten-free food. Other possibilities for cross-contamination are:

  • Toaster/toaster oven - use a separate toaster
  • Crumbs being left in jams, butter, condiments - use squeeze containers
  • Storage - make a separate space in cabinets and refrigerator
  • Double dipping - make sure that no one sticks utensils or food in gluten-free foods, such as butter or hummus.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/8/2015

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