cefpodoxime proxetil, (Vantin, Banan [discontinued]) (cont.)

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PREPARATIONS: Tablet: 100 and 200 mg; Granules for Oral Suspension: 50 and 100 mg/5 ml

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Probenecid increases the concentration of cefpodoxime in the blood. Drugs that reduce acidity in the stomach (for example, antacids, H2-blockers, proton pump inhibitors) may reduce absorption of cefpodoxime.

Combining cefpodoxime with drugs that reduce kidney function may increase the risk of harm to the kidney.

STORAGE: Tablets and granules should be stored at room temperature, 20 C – 25 C (68 F – 77 F). After mixing the granules with water, the suspension should be stored in a refrigerator, 2 C to 8 C (36 F to 46 F). The suspension should be shaken well before using and discarded ifunused after 14 days.

DOSING:

  • The adult dose for treating pneumonia, bronchitis, or sinusitis is 200 mg every 12 hours for 10 to 14 days depending on the type of infection.
  • Gonorrhea is treated with a single 200 mg dose. Urinary tract infections are treated with 100 mg every 12 hours for 7 to 14 days.
  • The dose for skin or skin structure infections is 400 mg every 12 hours for 70 to 14 days.

PREGNANCY AND BREASTFEEDING SAFETY:Safety in pregnancy has not been established for cefpodoxime. There are no adequate studies in pregnant women; however, studies in animals suggest no important effects on the fetus.

Cefpodoxime is excreted in human milk. The levels of cefpodoxime in human milk were 0, 2 and 6% of blood levels at 4 hours after a 200 mg oral dose. At 6 hours after dosing, the levels in breast milk were 0, 9 and 16% of the concentration of cefpodoxime in blood. Women should decide whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug.

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM:

  • Cefpodoxime proxetil is an oral antibiotic in the cephalosporin family of antibiotics.
  • The cephalosporin family includes cephalexin (Keflex), cefaclor (Ceclor), cefuroxime (Zinacef), cefprozil (Cefzil), and many injectable forms.
  • Cefpodoxime proxetil is converted to cefpodoxime, its active form, in the body. Like other cephalosporins, cefpodoxime stops bacteria from multiplying by preventing bacteria from forming the walls that surround them.
  • The walls are necessary to protect bacteria from their environment and to keep the contents of the bacterial cell together; most bacteria cannot survive without a cell wall.
  • Cefpodoxime is active against a wide spectrum of bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes (the cause of strep throat), Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, E. coli, Klebsiella, Proteus mirabilis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
  • The FDA approved cefpodoxime proxetil in August, 1992.

Medically reviewed by Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/19/2016


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