Caring for Stitches (Sutures)

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Stitches or sutures are one method used to close a wound. That wound may be an incision made in the operating room or an accidental laceration closed in the emergency department or doctor's office. While there may be some stitches that cannot be seen that are placed deep inside the wound, those that are visible on the skin need to be treated with care. Other wound closure options include staples and glue.

Whenever the skin has been damaged, there is potential for infection. The wound and the stitches that hold it together may be cleansed gently with mild soap and water after 24 hours. Twice daily washing may decrease the risk of infection. Sometimes, your doctor may recommend the use of an antibiotic ointment like bacitracin or Neosporin to help minimize infection.

It is important to avoid getting the wound dirty or very wet. Briefly showering may be advisable, but swimming should be avoided until the stitches are removed. Kids should avoid playing in the mud, sand, or water. A bandage or other covering might be necessary if the wound rubs up against clothing or if it is draining fluid.

When stitches are expected to be removed depends upon the location on the body. Facial wounds usually have stitches removed after 3 to 5 days, while those over a joint where the skin is constantly moving may be left in for a couple of weeks. It is important to return for stitch removal when advised by your doctor to minimize scarring and decrease the risk of infection. In some circumstances, the wound will be closed with absorbable or dissolvable stitches that do not need to be removed.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/7/2013