carbamazepine, Tegretol, Tegretol XR , Equetro, Carbatrol, Epitol, Teril (cont.)

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DOSING: Carbamazepine may be taken with or without food. Carbamazepine is excreted by the kidney and eliminated by the liver, and dosages may need to be lowered in patients with liver or kidney dysfunction.  Blood levels of carbamazepine are used for adjusting dosing. The dose for seizures is 800 to 1600 mg daily in divided doses. Trigeminal neuralgia is treated with 400-1200 mg daily in divided doses. The dose for treating bipolar disorder using Equetro is begun at 200 mg every 12 hours initially, and then increased by 200 mg a day up to a maximum dose of 1600 mg per day.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Carbamazepine interacts with multiple drugs, and caution should be used in combining other medicines with it. Lower levels of carbamazepine are seen when administrated with phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), or primidone (Mysoline). Warfarin (Coumadin), phenytoin (Dilantin), theophylline, and valproic acid (Depakote, Depakote ER, Depakene, Depacon) are more rapidly eliminated with carbamazepine, while carbamazepine levels are elevated when taken with erythromycin, cimetidine (Tagamet), propoxyphene (Darvon), and calcium channel blockers. Carbamazepine also increases the elimination of the hormones in birth control pills and can reduce the effectiveness of birth control pills. Unexpected pregnancies have occurred in patients taking both carbamazepine and birth control pills.

PREGNANCY: If possible, carbamazepine should not be used in pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

NURSING MOTHERS: If possible, carbamazepine should not be used in pregnancy or while breastfeeding.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/31/2014


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