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capreomycin - injection, Capastat Sulfate (cont.)

HOW TO USE: This medication is given by injection into a muscle or infused into a vein over 1 hour, usually by a health care professional. It is usually given once a day for 2 to 4 months then reduced to 2 or 3 times a week depending on your condition and response to treatment, or use as directed by your doctor. Before using this product, check it visually for particles. When mixed, this medication may be nearly colorless or very pale yellow. The color may darken over time, but this does not make this medication less effective. If the liquid has particles or has changed to any other color than pale or dark yellow, do not use it. Dosage is based on your medical conditions, kidney function, and response to treatment.If you are getting this medication by injection into a muscle, remember to change the injection site with each dose to prevent irritation. Also, inject this medication into a large muscle such as the buttock or thigh to lessen pain from the injection.Continue to use this medication until the full prescribed amount is finished, even if symptoms disappear. Stopping the medication too early may result in a return of the infection. It may be necessary to continue treatment for TB for 1 to 2 years. If needed, your doctor may switch you to a drug for this same condition that can be taken by mouth.This medication works best when the amount of medicine in your body is kept at a constant level. Therefore, take this drug at evenly spaced intervals. To help you remember, take it on the same day(s) of the week or at the same time each day, depending on your doctor's instructions. If you are taking this medication several times a week, it may help to mark your calendar with a reminder.Do not use more or less of this drug than prescribed or stop using it (or other TB medicines) even for a short time unless directed to do so by your doctor. Skipping or changing your dose without approval from your doctor may cause the amount of TB bacteria to increase, make the infection more difficult to treat (resistant), or worsen side effects. If TB becomes resistant to this medication, it might also become resistant to other TB medications.If you are giving yourself injections at home, make sure you learn how to prepare and inject this medication properly. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or nurse any questions you may have about how to give yourself this medication. Learn how to store and discard needles, medical supplies, and any unused medication safely. Never reuse needles or syringes. Consult your pharmacist.Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.



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