capreomycin - injection, Capastat

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GENERIC NAME: CAPREOMYCIN - INJECTION (KAP-ree-oh-MYE-sin)

BRAND NAME(S): Capastat

Warning | Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage

WARNING: Use capreomycin with extreme caution in people with hearing or kidney problems and in those using other drugs that may cause hearing or kidney problems (see Drug Interactions section).

Other injectable medications used to treat tuberculosis (e.g., streptomycin) should not be used with capreomycin because they will increase the risk of hearing and kidney problems.

USES: This medication is used with other drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) infections. Capreomycin belongs to a class of drugs known as antibiotics. It is believed to work by preventing the growth of the bacteria that causes TB.

HOW TO USE: This medication is given by injection into a muscle or infused into a vein over 1 hour, usually by a health care professional. It is usually given once a day for 2 to 4 months then reduced to 2 or 3 times a week depending on your condition and response to treatment, or use as directed by your doctor. Dosage is based on your medical condition, kidney function, and response to treatment.If you are using this medication at home, learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional. If you have any questions about using this medication properly, ask your health care professional. Before using this product, check it visually for particles. When mixed, this medication may be nearly colorless or very pale yellow. The color may darken over time, but this does not make this medication less effective. If the liquid has particles or has changed to any other color than pale or dark yellow, do not use it.If you are giving this medication by injection into a muscle, remember to change the injection site with each dose to prevent irritation. Also, inject this medication into a large muscle such as the buttock or thigh to lessen pain from the injection.Continue to use this medication until the full prescribed amount is finished, even if symptoms disappear. Stopping the medication too early may result in a return of the infection. It may be necessary to continue treatment for TB for 1 to 2 years. If needed, your doctor may switch you to a drug for this same condition that can be taken by mouth.This medication works best when the amount of medicine in your body is kept at a constant level. Therefore, use this drug at evenly spaced intervals. To help you remember, use it on the same day(s) of the week or at the same time each day, depending on your doctor's instructions. If you are using this medication several times a week, it may help to mark your calendar with a reminder.Do not use more or less of this drug than prescribed or stop using it (or other TB medicines) even for a short time unless directed to do so by your doctor. Skipping or changing your dose without approval from your doctor may cause the amount of TB bacteria to increase, make the infection more difficult to treat (resistant), or worsen side effects. If TB becomes resistant to this medication, it might also become resistant to other TB medications.Learn how to store and discard needles, medical supplies, and any unused medication safely. Never reuse needles or syringes.Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

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Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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