Canker Sores

  • Medical Author:
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

  • Medical Editor: Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP
    Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP

    Jerry R. Balentine, DO, FACEP

    Dr. Balentine received his undergraduate degree from McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland. He attended medical school at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine graduating in1983. He completed his internship at St. Joseph's Hospital in Philadelphia and his Emergency Medicine residency at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center in the Bronx, where he served as chief resident.

Quick GuideDental Health: Top Problems in Your Mouth

Dental Health: Top Problems in Your Mouth

What is the treatment for canker sores?

In most cases, canker sores do not require any treatment, and there is nothing specific you need to do to get rid of a canker sore because it usually will heal on its own. If a person already has a canker sore, there are home remedies that can be used to help relieve the pain or irritation caused by the sore and to speed healing:

  • Topical medications applied directly on the sore, mouthwashes, and oral medications can relieve pain or inflammation.
  • Avoid acidic foods such as citrus fruits or spicy foods that may aggravate the sore.
  • If there is any vitamin deficiency (a doctor can test for this), take supplementation as prescribed.
  • Brush teeth gently and use a brush with soft bristles.
  • Use toothpaste and mouthwash that does not contain sodium lauryl sulfate.
  • Another home remedy is to mix milk of magnesia with Benadryl liquid and use as a mouth rinse.
  • Other natural remedies include goldenseal mouth rinse, deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) gargled in warm water, and saltwater rinses. Continue Reading
Reviewed on 9/14/2015
References
REFERENCES:

Femiano, F., Lanza, Alessandro. et al. Guidelines for Diagnosis and Mangement of Aphthous and Stomatitis. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. August 2007; vol 26: pp 728-732.

PubMedHealth.gov. Canker Sore.

University of Maryland Medical Center. Goldenseal.

University of Maryland Medical Center. Licorice.

WebMD.com. Canker Sores.

WebMD.com. Understanding Canker Sore Symptoms.

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