C-Reactive Protein (CRP)

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

What is the outlook for those with an elevated C-reactive protein (CRP)?

The overall outlook for those with an elevated CRP largely depends on the cause. In general, the level may be elevated as a response to any inflammation or infection present in the body. The outlook will depend on the success of treatment directed at the underlying cause of the inflammation.

More specifically, as a risk assessment tool for cardiovascular disease, the elevation of CRP correlates with the presence of the traditional cardiac risk factors including, hypertension (high blood pressure), high cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, obesity, advanced age, cigarette smoking, and strong family history of cardiac disease. Diet, exercise, smoking cessation, and appropriate medical management of these risk factors in hopes of preventing future cardiovascular disease cannot be overemphasized.

REFERENCE:

Morrow, David A. "C-Reactive Protein in Cardiovascular Disease." UpToDate.com. Oct. 19, 2015. <http://www.uptodate.com/contents/c-reactive-protein-in-cardiovascular-disease>.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/11/2016

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